Wheels of Soul 2017 Summer Tour - Tedeschi Trucks Band

Red Butte Garden and Wells Fargo Present

Wheels of Soul 2017 Summer Tour - Tedeschi Trucks Band

The Wood Brothers, Hot Tuna

Tue · August 1, 2017

Doors: 5:30 pm / Show: 6:30 pm

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Tedeschi Trucks Band
Tedeschi Trucks Band
Tedeschi Trucks Band is an 11-member collective that thrills audiences worldwide with its transcendent live performances and award-winning albums. Formed in 2010 by husband-and-wife Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks, and featuring two harmony singers, a three-piece horn section, keyboards, bass and a pair of drummers, TTB disproves the adage "less is more" while building a devoted following of fans and critics alike.

Just three years in, Tedeschi Trucks Band has toured extensively throughout the U.S., Canada, Australia, Europe, and Japan, headlining the venerable Newport Jazz Festival, co-headlining tours with B.B. King and The Black Crowes, and playing to packed houses in the world's most celebrated venues from Red Rocks Amphitheatre and the Beacon Theatre to the Hollywood Bowl and Royal Albert Hall. TTB's debut release Revelator, produced at the couple's Swamp Raga home studio, earned both a Grammy and Blues Music Award while 2011's dynamic live follow-up, Everybody's Talkin', delivered a double-disc classic reminiscent of legendary concert recordings like Mad Dogs and Englishmen and The Allman Brothers Band's At Fillmore East. Currently the band is touring in support of its second studio effort, Made Up Mind, which entered the Billboard 200 at #11 and was hailed by Rolling Stone as "equal parts Stax and Muscle Shoals without dilution of either."

Emerging as one of the most respected guitarists of his generation, Trucks led his own Derek Trucks Band for over 15 years prior to teaming with Tedeschi. Presently and for the past 13 years the Florida native also performs as a full member of The Allman Brothers Band and has toured with both Eric Clapton and Carlos Santana. Additionally as the youngest musician to make the list, the slide guitar wunderkind was voted #16 of the top 100 Guitarists of All Time (Rolling Stone - November 2011) by a panel of fellow musicians and industry experts.

No stranger to center stage herself, singer-guitarist Susan Tedeschi started playing in bands in her hometown of Boston at age 13. Her knack for combining American roots music, particularly electric blues, Southern soul, and gospel, with passionate, awe-inspiring vocal prowess has resulted in a prolific solo career full of award-winning records, six Grammy nominations, and a devoted following. Blessed with a voice that ranges from powerful R&B belters to gentle ballads, Tedeschi is a talented guitarist as well, her style alternately recalling post-war electric blues and Hendrix-inspired rock.

Easily capable of shining as individuals, this ensemble of 11 is concerned more with the sound than the spotlight. Sharing a level of respect and camaraderie rarely found in rock and roll, Tedeschi Trucks Band has found a magical combination that delivers nightly an unforgettable, can't-miss concert experience, one the Boston Herald says, "booms like a soul thunderclap." For these musicians and their audiences, more is indeed more.
The Wood Brothers
The Wood Brothers
The cover of The Wood Brothers' gorgeous new album, 'Paradise,' is adorned with an illustration of a mule staring at a carrot dangling just inches in front of its mouth. The carrot, though, is hanging from a stick affixed to the mule's own head. "In some ways, he's already got it," explains guitarist Oliver Wood. "And in some ways, he'll never have it." That paradox is at the core of 'Paradise,' an album about longing and desire and the ways in which the pursuit of fulfillment can keep it perpetually out of our reach. It's a beautiful collection, the band's most sophisticated work to date and also their most rocking, with bassist Chris Wood playing electric on tracks for the first time. Recorded at Dan Auerbach's Easy Eye studio in Nashville, 'Paradise' captures the latest chapter in the ongoing evolution of a band—and a family—navigating the joy and challenges of a life in music. Dubbed "masters of soulful folk" by Paste, The Wood Brothers released their debut studio album, 'Ways Not To Lose,' on Blue Note in 2006. You'd be forgiven at the time for expecting it to be something of a side project. Chris Wood already had legions of devoted fans for his incomparable work as one-third of Medeski Martin & Wood, while his brother Oliver toured with Tinsley Ellis before releasing a half-dozen albums with his band King Johnson. Almost a decade later and with drummer Jano Rix added as a permanent third member, it's become quite clear that The Wood Brothers is indeed the main act. 'Paradise' follows the band's acclaimed 2013 release 'The Muse,' which was recorded almost entirely live around a tree of microphones in Zac Brown's Southern Ground studio. Hailed previously by the New York Times for their "gripping" vocals and by the LA Times for their "taught musicianship," the brothers found the live setting to be a remarkable showcase for their live chemistry and charismatic magnetism. But when it came time to record 'Paradise,' their fifth studio album, the band knew the music called for a different approach. "For this album, we wanted to have a more up-close and dry sound," explains Chris. "I worked on another record at Easy Eye and I just loved the room. Dan's studio is cool because it's not old, but it feels that way when you walk into it. It reminds me of Sun Studios. It just has that feeling of a small room with natural compression, and I think you hear that in the sounds on the record." The decision to record in Nashville was no coincidence either, as this marks the first album written with the entire band living in Music City. "Oliver and I spent a lot of hours just in a room together writing songs," says Chris. "That's really never happened before. All the music in the past was written long distance or over the course of touring. It's definitely the most collaborative album we've ever made."
"It was kind of a luxury to be able to play together not just at a soundcheck," adds Jano. "It was a different starting point. Rather than people bringing in compositions that were relatively finished, we were starting from the ground up as a group." The album opens with "Singing To Strangers," which sets the tone for what's to come both musically and thematically. "Singing to strangers is something we do every night," explains Oliver, "and there's some satisfaction about singing to strangers. It's this weird thing that I think we get addicted to. It's not that we need attention as much as we need connection. On a good night, when we're singing to strangers, everybody in the room bonds, and you have this amazing sense of connection." That desire for connection permeates the album, from "Touch Of Your Hand"—a song about what Chris describes as "the most basic human need that there is"—to "Two Places"—a track about longing for home and family while on the road—to "Never And Always," which examines the fundamental emotional experiences of loneliness and belonging. "Snake Eyes" and "American Heartache" both explore the dark side of longing, how the constant need for more in our consumer culture can engender a perpetual dissatisfaction with never having enough, while on "Without Desire," they find the beauty and the magic that the titular emotion can bring into our lives. "Desire gets a bad rap sometimes," explains Chris, "and people think it's the root of all of our problems. We wanted a song that said, 'Maybe it's not, maybe we need it.' What would it be like if we didn't desire all those good things in life?" In addition to Chris's electric bass, which appears on two tracks, the album also showcases Jano's "shuitar," a portmanteau for "shitty guitar." The name belies the instrument's complexity, though. It's actually an acoustic guitar that Jano has rigged up with noisemakers to function as an easy-to-travel-with drum kit. "I made one in The Wood Brothers because we needed a portable drum set we could take to play on sessions and on the radio," he explains, "but then we've been using it so much live, we started writing for it and not wanting it to even sound like a drum set anymore. We wanted to let it be its own thing." It turns up prominently on "Heartbreak Lullaby," which also features guitar playing from Oliver inspired by field recordings of African folk musicians. There's more to Jano than percussion, though, as he sits down at the piano on several tracks on 'Paradise,' including album closer "River Of Sin." "That song imagines how when people get baptized in a river, it's supposed to wash away their sins," explains Chris. "But what happens to the water? Where do the sins go? And what if you live downstream from all that baptizing?" "A lot of the songs are dealing with these themes of longing and desire," adds Oliver, "but the album finishes with 'River of Sin' because it's a positive and empowering message, which is that you can't really do anything unless you're persistent. The narrator is humble and understands that there are all these things larger than him and he's just trying to understand them and he's determined to do better and be as good as he can. And he recognizes the only way to do that is to keep trying." It's a fitting, lovely, gospel-tinged ending to an album that traces both the darkness and the beauty in our nature, the perpetual hope and the futility of it all. The quest for the carrot often blinds us to the fact that we already possess it, and that's the irony of desire. "He who is not contented with what he has would not be contented with what he would like to have." Socrates said that. "I can't live without desire / If I didn't want anything / Why would I rise? / Why would I sing?" The Wood Brothers said that.
Hot Tuna
Hot Tuna
The legendary Hot Tuna returns to the Beacon Theatre for one not-to be-missed musical bash. Tuna's Beacon shows have become an annual holiday tradition – a spontaneous, unforgettable evening of hard driving blues and soulful Americana.


Hot Tuna
(Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady)

A Living Legend in American Music

The name Hot Tuna invokes as many different moods and reactions as there are Hot Tuna fans — millions of them. To some, Hot Tuna is a reminder of some wild and happy times. To others, that name will forever be linked to their own discovery of the power and depth of American blues and roots music. To newer fans, Hot Tuna is a tight, masterful duo that is on the cutting edge of great music.

All of those things are correct, and more. For more than four decades, Hot Tuna has played, toured, and recorded some of the best and most memorable acoustic and electric music ever. And Hot Tuna is still going strong — some would say stronger than ever.

The two kids from 1950s Washington, D.C. knew that they wanted to make music. Jorma Kaukonen, son of a State Department official, and Jack Casady, whose father was a dentist, discovered guitar when they were teenagers (Jack, four years younger, barely so). They played, and they took in the vast panorama of music available in the nation's capital, but found a special love of the blues, country, and jazz played in small clubs.

Jorma went off to college, while Jack sat in with professional bands and combos before he was even old enough to drive, first playing lead guitar, then electric bass.

In the mid-1960s Jorma was invited to play in a rock'n'roll band that was forming in San Francisco; he knew just the guy to play bass and summoned his old friend from back east. The striking signature guitar and bass riffs in the now-legendary songs by the Jefferson Airplane were the result.

The half-decade foray into 1960s San Francisco rock music was for Jack and Jorma an additional destination, not the final one. They continued to play their acoustic blues on the side, sometimes performing a mini-concert amid a Jefferson Airplane performance, sometimes finding a gig afterwards in some local club. They were, as Jack says, "Scouting, always scouting, for places where we could play."

The duo did not go unnoticed and soon there was a record contract and not long afterwards a tour. Thus began a career that would result in more than two-dozen albums, thousands of concerts around the world, and continued popularity.

Hot Tuna has gone through changes, certainly. A variety of other instruments, from harmonica to fiddle to keyboards, have been part of the band over the years, and continue to be, varying from project to project. The constant, the very definition of Hot Tuna, has always been Jorma and Jack.

The two are not joined at the hip, though; through the years both Jorma and Jack have undertaken projects with other musicians and solo projects of their own. But Hot Tuna has never broken up, never ceased to exist, nor have the two boyhood pals ever wavered in one of the most enduring friendships in music.

Along the way, they have been joined by a succession of talented musicians: Drummers, harmonica players, keyboardists, backup singers, violinists and more, all fitting with Jorma and Jack's current place in the musical spectrum. Jorma and Jack certainly could not have imagined, let alone predicted, where the playing would take them. It's been a long and fascinating road to numerous, exciting destinations. Two things have never changed: They still love playing as much as they did as kids in Washington, D.C. and there are still many, many exciting miles yet to travel on their musical odyssey.

The Musicians

Jorma Kaukonen

In a career that has already spanned a half century, Jorma Kaukonen has been the leading practitioner and teacher of fingerstyle guitar, one of the most highly respected interpreters of American roots music, blues, and Americana, and at the forefront of popular rock-and-roll.

Jorma graduated from high school and headed off for Antioch College in Ohio. There he met Ian Buchanan, from New York City, who introduced him to the elaborate fingerstyle fretwork of the Rev. Gary Davis. Jorma was hooked.

A work-study program in New York introduced the increasingly skilled Kaukonen to that city's burgeoning folk-blues-bluegrass scene and many of its players. He would leave college and undertake overseas travels before returning to classes, this time in California.

There he earned money by teaching guitar. A friend who taught banjo mentioned to Jorma he and another friend were thinking of starting a band — was Jorma interested? Though he was less interested in rock than in the roots music that was his passion, Jorma decided to join. It would turn out he would even have something to do with the naming of the band. An acquaintance liked to tease his blues-playing friends by giving them nicknames which parodied those of blues legends. Jorma, he had decided, was "Blind Thomas Jefferson Airplane." When the new band needed a name, Jorma mentioned this, and thus the Jefferson Airplane was christened.

He sent word back to Washington, where his teenage musical partner Jack Casady had taken up electric bass. Did Jack want to come to San Francisco and be in a band?

The Kaukonen-Casady duo created much of the Jefferson Airplane's signature sound, and Jorma's lead and fingerstyle guitar playing characterizes some of the band's most memorable tracks. The two would often play clubs following Airplane performances. A record deal was made and Hot Tuna was born. Jorma left the Jefferson Airplane after the band's most productive five years. Hot Tuna had become a full-time job.

Jorma has also had a succession of more than a dozen solo albums, beginning with 1974's "Quah" and continuing through "Blue Country Heart" in 2002, the much-anticipated "Stars In My Crown," followed by the touching and very personal "River of Time." In February, 2015 Jorma releases "Aint In No Hurry" on Red House. Ain't In No Hurry, show Jorma at the top of his game. Playing with a confidence and a touch that come from a lifetime spent writing and performing.

Along with his wife, Vanessa, Jorma operates and teaches at Jorma Kaukonen's Fur Peace Ranch Guitar Camp. Here, on a sprawling and rustic yet modern campus, musicans and would-be musicians come for intensive and enjoyable workshops taught by Jorma, Jack and other extraordinary players like G.E. Smith, David Lindley, Steve Kimock, Bob Margolin, Chris Smither, Peter Rowan and more.

In addition, Jorma started BreakDownWay.com, a unique interactive teaching site that brings Jorma and Jack's (and a host of other outstanding musicians) musical instruction to students all over the world.

Jack Casady

Few musicians have the opportunity and skill to create an entire style of playing, but Jack Casady has done exactly that with the electric bass. With roots as a lead guitar player, Jack broadened the range and scope of the bass, taking it out of the rhythm category and bringing to it a world of complex and complementary melodies.

The son of a Washington, D.C.-area dentist, Jack fell in love with music at an early age and took full advantage of the wide cultural experience the city had to offer, from classical and jazz concerts to the strong southern musical influence to the small blues and jazz clubs not normally populated by children.

"One night I'd be down at the Howard Theater seeing Ray Charles," he remembers, "and the next night I would be at the Shamrock Tavern in Georgetown, hearing Mac Weisman, Lester Flatt and Earl Scruggs, and other bluegrass people. And the next night it would be jazz — people like Eric Dolphy and Roland Kirk." He took up guitar and became friends with an older boy, a guitar novice named Jorma Kaukonen.
Together they explored the area's music scene.

When Jorma went to college, young Jack continued his methodical study of guitar, often sitting in with local club bands. One night he was asked to play the bass, and thus began a love affair with the instrument that has endured for close to a half century.

Jack has played bass with numerous groups and legendary performers, from Jimi Hendrix to Government Mule and beyond. His signature bass sound was front and center in his critically acclaimed solo CD, "Dream Factor."

The inventor of the Jack Casady style of bass playing devotes much of his time to passing on what he has learned and invented, by teaching several times each year at Jorma's Fur Peace Ranch.

Over a decade ago, Jack designed The Jack Casady Signature Bass in collaboration with Epiphone. This bass is the culmination of years of experimentation playing with the Jefferson Airplane and Hot Tuna. Jack simply wanted to find an instrument with superb, balanced electric tone and the response of an acoustic bass.

With three very different models available, this bass continues to be one of Epiphone's hottest selling instruments and is played by some of the worlds most inventive bassists like Flea (Red Hot Chili Peppers), Chris Null, Josh Ward, Glenn Five aka G5 and Dominic Davis. The Epiphone Jack Casady Signature Bass is as unique as Jack, with a vibe, tone, and innovative features all its own.
Venue Information:
Red Butte Garden Amphitheatre
2280 E. Red Butte Canyon Road
Salt Lake City, UT, 84108
http://redbuttegarden.ticketfly.com/